Copperband Butterflyfish

Copperband Butterflyfish, Chelmon rostratus, also commonly called the Beak Coralfish is found in reefs in both the Pacific and Indian Oceans. This butterflyfish is one of the three species in the genus Chelmon, all being known for having longer beaks.

Copperband butterflyfish
     
Chelmon rostratus
Minimum Size at least more 50 gallons
75 – 84°F
8.1 – 8.4
1.020 – 1.025
Peaceful
Difficult
  

Characterized by a tall, flat body and a long, pointed snout, the Copperband Butterflyfish possesses an undeniably unique silhouette. Its body is adorned with vertical, coppery-orange bands, beautifully contrasted against a silvery-white background. These bands, which contribute to its common name, are set off by a prominent black margin. At the base of its rear dorsal and anal fins, a false eyespot lends the Copperband Butterflyfish a distinctive touch, providing a clever visual trick to deter potential predators.

copperband butterflyfish

In the aquarium, the Copperband Butterflyfish is a challenging species to keep due to its specific dietary requirements and sensitivity to poor water conditions. It is a species best suited for experienced aquarists willing to provide the necessary time and resources for their care. Maintaining high water quality is paramount, as they are highly susceptible to bacterial and parasitic infections.

Copperband butterflyfish can grow to 8 inches however in an aquarium are generally found at 1 / 2 that size. They live well at a normal reef temperature range of 75 to 84 F (24 to 29 C), with a tank size at least 75 gallons with a lot of live rock to graze on. Copperband butterflyfish isn’t 100% reef-aquarium safe.

copperband butterflyfish

Copperband Butterflyfish is a difficult fish to feed, it is a shy and deliberate feeder that may require many types of foods offered to it in order to start feeding. Copperband butterflyfish will eat many invertebrates, including parasitic forms such as Calliactis parasitica and common glass anemone (aiptasia) (Parasitic anemone). The Aiptasia is the last choice of food though; all tube and substrate worms, clams, mollusks are its prey.

Furthermore, replicating their natural diet can prove to be difficult. While they can be trained to eat more readily available foods like frozen shrimp, initially, they may only accept live food. Another challenge is their predisposition towards stress, which can be mitigated by providing plenty of hiding spaces and ensuring they are not housed with aggressive tank mates.

copperband butterflyfish

Copperband butterflyfish fish is actually more peaceful the longer it is settled in the aquarium. However This is not a recommended fish for novice aquarists, as it requires excellent tank conditions to thrive or even survive.

Despite its challenges, successfully housing a Copperband Butterflyfish can be incredibly rewarding. Its graceful movements, bright bands of color, and long, tapering snout make it a captivating centerpiece in any marine aquarium.

copperband butterflyfish

copperband butterflyfish

copperband butterflyfish

the Copperband Butterflyfish is an aquatic jewel, boasting of an arresting blend of colors and patterns that can bring a touch of marine splendor to any aquarium. This species, while requiring considerable experience and care to keep in captivity, offers a deep sense of satisfaction and aesthetic pleasure to those willing to take up the challenge. In their silent, fluid elegance, these fish remind us of the staggering diversity of life forms on our planet, particularly within the ocean’s depths. Indeed, the Copperband Butterflyfish is more than just a pretty face – it’s a symbol of the aquatic world’s extraordinary beauty and complexity.

By fishexp